The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children
Annual statistical report 2012

The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children
Annual statistical report 2012

Published by the Australian Institute of Family Studies, 2012, 184 pp.

Download printable version report: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children Annual statistical report 2012 (PDF 6.85 MB)

Foreword

I am pleased to introduce the third volume of the Annual Statistical Report series for Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC). This series aims to provide the evidence base for future research and policy development to support family functioning and children's health and wellbeing.

Using longitudinal data collected about children's development from ages 0 to 11 years old, this report covers a range of policy-relevant issues. Family functioning is the focus of chapters on children's relationships with parents in shared care-time arrangements, financial support for children after parental separation and intergenerational disadvantage. Children's wellbeing in the school context is addressed in chapters focusing on children's experiences of bullying and school attendance. The report also discusses how children aged 10-11 years spend their time after school, while children's health and health activities are covered in chapters on children's allergies and children's physical activity. For the first time in this series, the report also includes a chapter on the outcomes and transitions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

By providing statistical snapshots of children's development and wellbeing across time, this report is a valuable source of information for policy-makers, researchers and practitioners.

Alan Hayes

Director

Australian Institute of Family Studies

 

Acknowledgements

The Australian Institute of Family Studies thanks the Australian Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) for funding this report, and the FaHCSIA LSAC Team for their contributions.

We are also grateful to our many independent reviewers for their comments on earlier versions of specific chapters including:

  • Bruce Smyth, Australian Demographic and Social Research Institute, Australian National University;
  • Christine Millward, Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne;
  • Gerry Redmond, Social Policy Research Centre, University of New South Wales;
  • Sheldon Rothman, Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation, Australian Council for Education research;
  • Kenneth Rigby, School of Education, University of South Australia;
  • Tim Olds, School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia; and
  • Naomi Priest, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne.

For more information about the study, see <www.growingupinaustralia.gov.au>.

This report uses unit record data from Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. The study is conducted in partnership between the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS), and Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). The findings and views reported in this report are those of the individual authors and should not be attributed to FaHCSIA, AIFS or the ABS.

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