The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children Annual statistical report 2013

The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children Annual statistical report 2013

Published by the Australian Institute of Family Studies, 2014, 166 pp.

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Foreword

I am delighted to present the fourth volume in the Annual Statistical Report series for Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC). This report, produced by the Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS), aims to provide valuable insights into family functioning and child development for researchers, policy makers, those who provide services, and members of the community at large.

This report covers a variety of aspects of the ways in which Australian children's experiences and environments affect their prospects and progress, from birth to 11 years old. The content of this work casts light on the following aspects of family functioning: fathers' involvement in the lives of their children after separation, care of children during school holidays and children's perceptions of parental employment. Children's health behaviour is addressed in chapters on children's eating habits and their dissatisfaction with body image and related consequences. The report also investigates several aspects of children's development, including academic engagement, social and emotional wellbeing, and temperament. How children spend their time and parental concerns about neighbourhood environment and safety are also discussed.

We hope that the results of this research will prove useful to interested readers of this volume. We further hope that the wealth of information provided here will encourage others to use the LSAC data, both now and in the future.

Alan Hayes

Director

Australian Institute of Family Studies

Acknowledgements

The Australian Institute of Family Studies thanks the Australian Government Department of Social Services (DSS) for funding this report, and the DSS LSAC Team for their contribution.

We wish to acknowledge the valuable comments of our independent reviewers on earlier versions of specific chapters, including:

  • Alison Carver, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University;
  • Barbara Pocock, Centre for Work and Life, University of South Australia;
  • David Crawford, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University;
  • Gerry Redmond, School of Social and Policy Studies, Flinders University;
  • John Ainley, Educational Monitoring and Research, Australian Council for Educational Research;
  • Lawrie Moloney, Australian Institute of Family Studies;
  • Linda Harrison, School of Teacher Education, Charles Sturt University; and
  • Marita McCabe, School of Psychology, Deakin University.

We also gratefully acknowledge the enormous contribution of the families and teachers who participated in the study.

For more information about the study, see the LSAC website at: <www.aifs.gov.au/growingup>.

This report uses unit record data from Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. The study is being undertaken in partnership with the Australian Institute of Family Studies, with advice being provided by a consortium of leading researchers at research institutions and universities throughout Australia. The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) conducts the data collection.

The views expressed in this report are those of the individual authors and should not reflect those of the DSS, AIFS or ABS.

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