The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children Annual statistical report 2014

The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children Annual statistical report 2014

Published by the Australian Institute of Family Studies, 2015, 150 pp. ISBN 978-1-76016-002-9; ISSN 1839-5775 (online)

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Foreword

I am pleased to introduce the fifth volume of the Annual Statistical Report series for Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC). This series aims to inform policy development and guide initiatives that focus on strengthening, supporting and sustaining families.

Along with recently released Wave 5 data, this report covers a variety of aspects of the ways in which Australian children's experiences and environments affect their prospects and progress, from birth to 13 years of age. The report casts light on the perceptions of children about parental separation; and for the first time in this series, gender role attitudes of partnered mothers and fathers are discussed and related to the paid and unpaid work within the household. Other sections of the report investigate aspects of children's development, including their early learning experiences at home, difficulties experienced during the transition to high school, and parents' expectations about their children's education. Early onset of criminal and delinquent behaviour among children in late childhood and early adolescence is also covered.

The results of Growing up in Australia are increasingly used to advance broader understanding of the factors affecting the wellbeing of Australian families, and are proving useful to researchers, policy-makers, those who provide services and support, and to the community at large.

Alan Hayes
Director
Australian Institute of Family Studies

Acknowledgements

This report uses unit record data from Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC). LSAC is conducted in partnership between the Australian Government Department of Social Services, the Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) and the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), with advice provided by a consortium of leading researchers from research institutions and universities throughout Australia.

AIFS thanks the Australian Government Department of Social Services (DSS) for funding this report, and the DSS LSAC team for their contribution.

The Institute wishes to acknowledge the valuable comments of its independent reviewers on earlier versions of specific chapters, including:

  • Belinda Hewitt, School of Social Science, University of Queensland;
  • Cain Polidano, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, University of Melbourne;
  • Donna Berthelsen, School of Early Childhood, Queensland University of Technology;
  • Graham Daniel, School of Teacher Education, Charles Sturt University; and
  • Judith Cashmore, Faculty of Law, University of Sydney.

AIFS would also like to acknowledge and thank the children, families and teachers who generously give their time to participate in the study.

For more information about the study, see the LSAC website <www.growingupinaustralia.gov.au>.

The opinions, comments and/or analysis expressed in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of DSS, AIFS or the ABS.

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