The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children Annual statistical report 2015

The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children Annual statistical report 2015

Published by the Australian Institute of Family Studies, 2016, 172 pp. ISBN 978-1-76016-109-5; ISSN 1839-5775 (online)

Download printable version report: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children Annual statistical report 2015 (PDF 2.70 MB)

Foreword

I am pleased to introduce the sixth volume of the Annual Statistical Report series for Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC). This report, which has been produced by the Australian Institute of Family Studies, aims to provide valuable insights into family functioning and child development for researchers, policy-makers, and those who provide services and support, as well as the community at large.

Using five waves of LSAC data, this report covers a variety of aspects of the ways in which Australian children's experiences and environments affect their prospects and progress, from birth to 13 years old.

This report casts light on diversity and change in children's family structures, and how the experience of household complexity changes as children grow. The report also examines the association between pubertal status and children's emotional functioning, school functioning and their relationships with peers. Rates of full, partial, and non-immunisation of Australian children are presented in a chapter exploring how these rates vary with different demographic, psychosocial and attitudinal factors. Another section of the report investigate the different ways grandparents are part of children's lives, looking at grandparents who are co-resident or who provide child care, and looking at the amount of contact that children have with their grandparents. The factors associated with parents' choice of primary school for their children are also examined. Patterns of screen time among Australian children are also explored, looking at how much time boys and girls at different ages spend watching television, using the computer or playing electronic games.

We hope that results of our research will prove useful to interested readers. We further hope that the wealth of information provided here will encourage others to use the LSAC data, both now and in the future.

Anne Hollonds
Director
Australian Institute of Family Studies

Acknowledgements

The Australian Institute of Family Studies thanks the Australian Government Department of Social Services (DSS) for funding this report, and the DSS LSAC team for their contribution.

We wish to acknowledge the valuable comments of our independent reviewers on earlier versions of specific chapters including:

  • Lyn Craig, Social Policy Research Centre, University of NSW;
  • Naomi Hackworth, Judith Lumley Centre, LaTrobe University;
  • Leonie Rutherford, Faculty of Arts and Education, Deakin University;
  • Lisa Mundy, Murdoch Children's Research Institute
  • Anna Zhu, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, University of Melbourne; and
  • Frank Beard, National Centre for Immunisation Research.

We also gratefully acknowledge the enormous contribution of the families and teachers who participated in the study.

For more information about the study, see the LSAC website <www.growingupinaustralia.gov.au>.

This report uses unit record data from Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. The study is conducted in partnership with the Australian Institute of Family Studies, with advice being provided by a consortium of leading researchers at research institutions and universities throughout Australia. The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) conducts the data collection.

The views expressed in this report are those of the individual authors and should not reflect those of DSS, AIFS or the ABS.

Full contents

Top