The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children Annual statistical report 2016

The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children Annual statistical report 2016

Published by the Australian Institute of Family Studies, 2017, 200 pp. ISBN 978-1-76016-109-5; ISSN 978-1-76016-142-2 (online)

Download printable version report: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children Annual statistical report 2016 (PDF 2.68 MB)

Foreword

I am pleased to introduce the seventh volume of the Annual Statistical Report series for Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC). This report, produced by the Australian Institute of Family Studies, aims to provide valuable insights into family functioning and child development for researchers, policy-makers, and those who provide services and support, as well as the community at large.

Using six waves of LSAC data, this report discusses ways in which Australian children's experiences and environments affect their prospects and progress, from birth to 15 years old. Opportunities and challenges faced by adolescents are addressed in chapters on the employment of young teens, and how child and family characteristics are associated with patterns of employment; their career aspirations and the types of jobs they see themselves doing as adults. Another section of the report investigates the association between parents' drinking and the drinking of their 14−15 year old children, exploring how this relationship differs by the gender of the parents and their adolescent. The report also casts light on the prevalence of self-harm and suicidal behaviour among 14–15 year olds, the risk factors associated with these behaviours and the extent to which poor socio-emotional health earlier in life is associated with self-harm and suicide attempts. Involvement of teens in informal care for others and the impact of these caring activities on their academic achievement is also discussed in detail. Family functioning is the focus of a chapter on children's home experiences over a ten-year time period, according to the age at which their mother had her first child. For the first time in this series, the report includes a chapter on aspects of school life by examining differences in teaching practices according to the year level of the student and characteristics of the school, teacher and class as reported by teachers' themselves.

We hope that results of our research will prove useful to interested readers. We further hope that the wealth of information provided here will encourage others to use the LSAC data, both now and in the future."

Anne Hollonds
Director
Australian Institute of Family Studies

Acknowledgements

The Australian Institute of Family Studies thanks the Australian Government Department of Social Services (DSS) for funding this report, and the DSS LSAC team for their contribution.

We wish to acknowledge the valuable comments of our independent reviewers on earlier versions of specific chapters including:

  • Myra Hamilton, Social Policy Research Centre, University of NSW;
  • John Hattie, Melbourne Graduate School of Education, University of Melbourne;
  • Christine Millward, Parenting Research Centre;
  • Wendy Patton, Faculty of Education, Queensland University of Technology;
  • Chris Ryan, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, University of Melbourne;
  • John Toumbourou, Faculty of Health, Deakin University; and
  • Stephen Zubrick, Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia.

We also gratefully acknowledge the enormous contribution of the families and teachers whoparticipated in the study.

For more information about the study, see the LSAC website.

This report uses unit record data from Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. The study is conducted in partnership with the Australian Institute of Family Studies, with advice being provided by a consortium of leading researchers at research institutions and universities throughout Australia. The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) conducts the data collection.

This report uses unit record data from Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. The study is conducted in partnership with the Australian Institute of Family Studies, with advice being provided by a consortium of leading researchers at research institutions and universities throughout Australia. The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) conducts the data collection.

This report has been compiled and written by staff at the Australian Institute of Family Studies.1 The views expressed in this report are those of the individual authors and should not reflect those of DSS, AIFS or the ABS.

1 Ben Edwards is now working at the ANU Centre for Social Research Methods. Jacqueline Homel is working at Griffith Criminology Institute, Griffith University. Gary Zhenyu Zhang is now working at Macquarie University

Full contents

Foreword

Acknowledgements

1. Introduction and overview of LSAC data

2. The career aspirations of young adolescent boys and girls
Jennifer Baxter

3. Teen employment experiences
Jennifer Baxter and Diana Warren

4. Parental influences on adolescents' alcohol use
Jacqueline Homel and Diana Warren

5. Young carers
Diana Warren and Ben Edwards

6. Self-harm and suicidal behaviour of young people aged 14–15 years old
Galina Daraganova

7. Teaching practices in Australian primary schools
Suzanne Vassallo, Galina Daraganova, Gary Zhenyu Zhang and Jacqueline Homel

8. Maternal age and family circumstances of firstborn children
Lixia Qu and Ruth Weston

Top